HVAC Can Flood Your House

Good Deals Heating and Cooling HVAC

HVAC units remove heat, cold, and moisture from your house, but this process has an unfortunate by-product in the form of moisture build-up. There is a built-in mechanism designed to address this issue, but sometimes, it fails. When this happens, the unit leaks excessive water—flooding your house. Other problems, such as malfunctioning parts of the HVAC units, can cause moisture build-up as well.

Water Build-up on HVAC Units

While moisture build-up on the HVAC units is perfectly normal, it becomes a problem when it leaks into your house. To better understand this scenario, try pouring cold water into a glass on a hot day. Notice the moisture build-up on the exterior of the glass; eventually, it begins to drip down.

This condensation process happens in your standard AC unit. An AC unit contains an evaporator coil that houses the cold refrigerant. Warm air inside your room is blown over it, cooling the air and causing moisture to build-up on the coils. This moisture then drips into a drip pan and down a condensate drain line that leads out of your home. This process is contained inside the HVAC unit. If you see any water outside the unit, there is a problem.  Listed are a few reasons why there may be water escaping from your HVAC unit.

Clogged Condensate Drain Line

A clogged drain line is the number one cause of water leaks from your AC unit. Accumulated dirt can easily find its way to the drain line with the help of water flow. When this happens, water backs up. Backed water causes further problems because it can create sludge and mold, clogging the line even more and will eventually fill up the drip pan—overflowing the unit.

There are numerous unclogging methods, but a guaranteed way is to have a professional use a vacuum to suck out the blockage material or opt for a drain line with an air vent and P-trap.

Old Damaged Drip Pan

Due to its long service duration, old drip pans can develop rust and holes, so water just falls right through. If this happens, you must replace it with a new drip pan.  Maybe add it to your yearly maintenance routine.

Malfunctioning Condensate Pump

If your HVAC units are located in the basement, it needs a condensate pump to push the water outside your home. But if the pump is malfunctioning, there will be no means to push water outside and will eventually fill up the drip pan—overflowing the unit. Ensure that the condensate pump is functioning soundly.

Dirty Air Filter

Dirty air filters block the smooth airflow of warm air to the evaporator coils. Due to obstructions, an insufficient amount of warm air is blown over the evaporator coils causing it to get too cold and freeze over. The accumulated ice will eventually melt, and the drip pan may not be able to handle the excess water, causing it to overflow. Cleaning your air filter is an easy task, and you need to do it frequently to prevent dirt build-up.

Misaligned Unit Placement

AC units placed on an inclined surface may not allow condensation to drain properly. Instead, install the unit slightly inclined towards the condensate drain line to force the water into the drain line by gravity.

Unsealed Unit

If your AC unit is not sealed completely, warm air can get inside the unit. Excess warm air constitutes excess moisture build-up due to condensation, which can overflow the drip pan. Ensure that your unit is correctly sealed.

If you see water pooling near your HVAC unit, call the professionals at Good Deals Heating and Cooling at 215-947-1166.

Why Should I Get an HVAC Maintenance Agreement?

Good Deals Heating and Cooling HVAC maintenance agreement


So you went out and bought an HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) unit, and now you are faced with an essential question. Should you protect that purchase with an HVAC Maintenance Agreement? There is a lot of misinformation out there regarding HVAC Maintenance Agreements. There are sound reasons for getting a maintenance agreement, but the most critical question to ask yourself is: Do I feel comfortable not having one? If the HVAC system needs repairing or replacement, can your budget absorb those costs without much difficulty? A service agreement brings peace of mind that you’ll never be without heat or cooling.

Let’s start by learning what exactly comes with an HVAC Maintenance Agreement. An HVAC Maintenance Agreement is a contract between the customer and the service provider where the customer pays a set amount, and the provider performs routine maintenance on the HVAC unit. Some contracts include a priority treatment clause, which will come in handy if the HVAC dies at the worst possible moment (think mid-summer or mid-winter). The customer with an agreement jumps to the front of the line.

One of the most significant benefits to the HVAC Maintenance Agreement is regular maintenance on the unit. Just like a car needs regular maintenance done to catch small issues before they become expensive problems, the same is true with an HVAC system. Through routine maintenance, you can rest easy knowing that your purchase is being cared for and protected for when you need it the most.

The final case for an HVAC Maintenance Agreement is the preventative cost measures associated with the plan. Customers typically have several plans presented to them through their HVAC provider. Many of them will include repairs being fully or partially covered. If the technician detects a problem during routine maintenance or repairs are needed on a cold or scorching day, the fixes are included in the cost of doing business. Older HVAC units are no longer under warranty, so the best way to save money is to have regular maintenance before peak seasonal use. Plus it is comforting to know that when disaster strikes, the repairmen will be visiting your house first.

The HVAC Maintenance Agreement, provides security, financial coverage, and peace of mind.

If you have questions about an HVAC Maintenance Agreement contact Good Deals Heating and Cooling at 215-947-1166.

Backup Power Generator Safety Tips

Good Deals Heating and Cooling backup power generator

With storms on the horizon, many backup power generators are sold every year. These generators are used as a household electrical backup. And because of the electrical power they generate, safety is a critical issue. It is a fact that generators made by well-known manufacturers conform strict safety rules. But if not properly installed or operated even the safest generator can become a hazard. This article will give you some safety tips and how to avoid the most common mistakes.

Owner’s Manual – Read the Owner’s Manual that came with your generator. It is essential that you know the basics of operating the generator. If you have read the manual before an emergency, you will be better prepared to use the generator when needed. So read the manual NOW. If you misplaced the manual, then download a copy of it at the generator manufacturer’s website. Have the model and serial number on hand (this is found on the generator), so you can download the correct manual.

Proper Installation – A qualified, licensed electrician should install backup power generators to ensure that they meet local electrical codes. Power from an improperly installed generator can back feed along power lines and electrocute anyone coming in contact with them, including line workers making repairs.

Grounding -Make sure your backup power generator is properly grounded. The manual will describe how to do this.

Water – Keep the generator dry. Water is an excellent electrical conductor.

Extension Cords – Make sure extension cords used with a generator are rated for the load, are free of cuts and worn insulation, and have three-pronged plugs.

Proper Load – Generators are rated to carry a certain load. Do not overload the generator. A backup power generator should be used when absolutely necessary and only to power essential appliances or equipment.

Ventilation – Never operate the generator in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces. Backup power Generators produce high levels of carbon monoxide very quickly, which can be deadly in poorly ventilated areas. Also, do not place generators near any air intake vents to the home.

Circuit Interrupter – Use a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) to help prevent electrocutions and electrical shock injuries. Portable GFCIs require no tools to install.

Fuel – Make sure fuel for the generator is stored safely, away from living areas, in properly labeled containers and away from fuel-burning appliances. Always make sure the generator is off and let it cool down before refueling.

Shutting Down – Turn off all appliances powered by the generator before shutting down the generator.

Children and Pets – Keep children and pets away from power generators at all times.

These safety tips will help you safely use your backup power generator when there is a power outage due to a storm.

For more information on repairs to your heating and cooling system, contact Good Deals Heating and Cooling at 215-947-1166.

What To Do If Your Heat Goes Out On Christmas Day

Good Deals Heating and Cooling HVAC repairWinter ushers in Christmas and New Year’s Day which are times for fun and celebration. Unfortunately, winter is also the time of year when the weather can take down power lines or overstress a furnace resulting in a breakdown. So what should you do if it’s cold outside and the heat stops?

Being prepared is always a good idea. Having a power generator, a kerosene heater, a toasty fireplace with plenty of wood or a wood/pellet burning stove, are all great ideas. Unfortunately, having ready sources of backup heat is not always an option, and many of us are caught unprepared when the furnace goes silent. What should you do to stay warm while waiting for the repairman to come?

The first thing to determine why the furnace stopped. Is it due to a power outage? Call the power company and find out how long you may be without power. Knowing what you are facing helps you plan the actions you should take. If the problem is with the furnace, call an HVAC repair service. Once again, determine when a service provider will be able to come out and do the repair.

Next, assess what you have to keep warm. Gather blankets, sleeping bags, winter clothing, and any warming aids (chemical hand and body warmers) that you can find. Do you still have hot water? Empty glass bottles make great warmers when filled with hot water.

Insulate to Keep the Heat In and the Cold Out

Wear layers of clothing to maintain warmth. Start with a base layer, ideally thermal underclothes. These garments are designed to trap air against your skin to keep you warm. On top of the thermal underclothes, add a wool sweater or thick sweatshirt. For the legs put on denim jeans or wool pants. This second layer should be breathable fabrics that still allow airflow. If it is extremely cold, top off these clothes with a jacket or coat – a garment that “seals” the heat. Remember your extremities so add gloves, scarves, a woolen hat, ear muffs, and even boots.

Drink Warm Liquids

Ingesting warm liquids in the form of tea or soup helps the body stay warm. Staying hydrated will help the body generate the heat required to function. Avoid drinking alcohol because the “warming effect” you feel is false. Alcohol does not contribute to warming the body.

Pick a Room

Is there a room in your house or apartment that can accommodate everyone and can be closed off from the rest of the house/apt? Set up camp in that room. It will be much easier to stay warm together in one place than spread out. Whenever possible, bundle up in blankets, sleeping bags, and extra clothing.

Don’t Block Your Radiators

If your apartment has radiators, they should always be kept clean – any amount of dirt and dust sitting on top of them will absorb some of the heat that is produced. You should also remove any radiator covers when the heat is on, as covers can block the airflow through the radiator in addition to absorbing heat.  Move your furniture so that all chairs, couches, bookcases, entertainment units, desks, beds, etc. are not too close to your radiators or heating convectors. Don’t let your drapes or curtains cover them either, as they will divert heat to the windows (and therefore out of your apartment if they aren’t adequately sealed) instead of into the rest of the room.

What Not To Do

  • Don’t use your oven to warm the house.
  • Don’t use propane heaters or charcoal stoves in the house (or garage). Staying warm is important, staying alive is even more so. Carbon Monoxide is toxic and accounts for hundreds of deaths every winter.
  • Don’t use hot showers or baths to warm up as your body temperature will drop to a lower level afterward. When in doubt, stick with extra clothes, sleeping bags, blankets, hot water bottles, and shared body warmth to keep you warm.

Prepare yourself and then have a beautiful, happy, peaceful, and safe Christmas. Enjoy the break and recharge your batteries for work in New Year.

Contact Good Deals Heating and Cooling for emergency HVAC repair.  Call 215-947-1166.